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MMR2021

Time to re-visit and re-appraise mixed migration

About the Mixed Migration Review 2021

The global context is fast changing and with new geopolitical emergencies (conflicts and disasters), new public health threats (pandemics(s)), new levels of environmental stress (accelerating climate change), changing trends in movement and government policy affecting movement, changing perceptions around migration, ambivalent forecasting prognosis and improved data resources, now is the time to re-visit and re-appraise mixed migration through the lens of different themes in one volume.

How does the Covid-19 pandemic change migrant decision making, migration governance, urbanisation trends and public sentiment towards migration? What extraordinary actions and policies towards refugees and migrants were witnessed this past year – both negative and positive? How is the climate emergency affecting mobility and displacement around the world? How and to what extent does immobility affect individuals, communities and regions? What are the trends and realities around returns globally, many of them forced? What are the experiences of those on the move on the world’s overlooked mixed migration routes?

The Mixed Migration Review (MMR) 2021 will offer a comprehensive annual analysis of mixed migration, through the overarching lens of re-appraising mixed migration. This edition contains yearly updates on global mixed migration trends and policy developments, in addition to thematic essays by and interviews with leading experts and thought leaders. A section on 4Mi data on the role and use of smugglers and the drivers of mixed migration is complemented by a series of in-depth interviews with refugees and migrants, highlighting their often-extraordinary experiences and circumstantial journeys. New features include a sister section to the Normalisation of the Extreme, outlining positive and progressive developments in the realm of mixed migration. Additionally, this year’s review also showcases the six essays of the winners from the first MMC ‘alternative voices’ competition, specifically inviting researchers and writers from the global south to share their insights and reflections.