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Mixed Migration Review 2022

Alternative ideas & solutions for contemporary mixed migration challenges

Save the Date for the Virtual Launch of the Mixed Migration Review 2022

The impact of the war in Ukraine as well as the socio-economic legacy of the Covid-19 pandemic are being felt profoundly across the world as prices rise, food insecurity grows, and an economic slow-down takes hold. All of these dynamics are impacting upon migration and forced displacement.

The Mixed Migration Review 2022, the Mixed Migration Centre’s flagship annual report, reflects on recent events and emerging trends affecting refugees and migrants globally, attempting to document, analyse, and suggest solutions. Is the “root causes” approach distracting from a rights-based approach? Is migration diplomacy “weaponizing” migration to achieve geopolitical aims? How effective can legal pathways ever hope to be as a solution to irregular migration? To what extent is the continued criminalisation of smuggling a smokescreen for the reduction and deterrence of irregular migration? What ethical issues are posed by the fast-rising use of technology and artificial intelligence in immigration and border control? Are irregular journeys “Kamikaze migration” or rational choices and how do notions of risk taking differ around the world? To what degree is human trafficking going on within mixed migration? How do we assess the response to missing migrants and the forensic investigations that are trying to treat those who perish and their families with dignity?

As always, in addition to the expert essays, the MMR includes interviews with critical thinkers and practitioners in the sector, and new analysis from 4Mi surveys conducted with thousands of refugees and migrants. It documents the best and worst behaviour by authorities in relation to mixed migration in the past year in our annual “normalising (and resisting) the extreme” features, and showcases alternative perspectives from young researchers from the global south.

Join us on 6 December (15:00-17:00 CET) for the virtual launch of the MMR2022, where we will be debating & discussing some of today’s most pressing mixed migration issues globally with experts, journalists and academics. Further details about the agenda will be available in October. We look forward to your participation!

Register on Zoom

About the MMR 2022

As the world looks to recover from the Covid-19 pandemic, the impact of the war in Ukraine as well as the pandemic’s socio-economic legacy is being felt profoundly across the world as price rises, shortages, a food crisis, and a looming economic slow-down take hold.  

Meanwhile, forced displacement, both internal and international, has never been higher, affecting more than 100 million people by mid-2022 according to the UN, as people continue to flee conflict, violence, human rights violations, persecution, and natural disasters. Violence in Ethiopia, Burkina Faso, Myanmar, Nigeria, Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Ukraine is driving this escalation, while a changing climate and unequal economic and social outcomes also continue to act as strong drivers for mobility in a global space of ever-restricted asylum and migration opportunities.  

In May of this year, the first International Migration Review Forum took place. An intergovernmental platform to discuss the successes and challenges of implementing the 2018 Global Compact on Migration (GCM), this event also reaffirmed the aspirations and ideals of the GCM and the importance of a whole-of-society approach to migration. 

In this context, the 2022 Mixed Migration Review, the Mixed Migration Centre’s flagship annual report, attempts to document, analyse, and suggest solutions to some of the most relevant and recent changes affecting refugees and migrants globally. Through interviews with critical thinkers and practitioners in the sector, as well as essays and other content, this year’s Review tackles questions around migration diplomacy, the rising use of technology in immigration and border control, the criminalisation of smugglers as a political smokescreen to reduce irregular migration, the response to missing migrants, and the extent of human trafficking within mixed migration. It also explores the debate between using a “root causes”’ approach as opposed to a rights-based approach to migration, while asking how effective regular channels of mobility can ever hope to be in a context where necessity forces many migrants to take risks using irregular means of movement. As always, the Review also includes data visualisations drawn from surveys of thousands of refugees and migrants, provides a platform for the alternative perspectives of young researchers from the global south, and documents the best and worst behaviour by authorities in relation to mixed migration in the past year in our annual “normalising (and resisting) the extreme” features.